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Introduction

More than 80 years ago, Toyota Motor Corporation began when Toyoda Automatic Loom Works created an internal department to investigate a new technology: automobile engines. Kiichiro Toyoda saw automobiles would change society, and he understood what mattered was not a machine that could move, but rather what that machine could do for human mobility.

Today, steep declines in the cost of sensors, exponential growth in computing power, and a revolution in the development of artificial intelligence systems once again means technology is poised to revolutionize mobility. At Toyota, we see the potential for automated driving technologies to expand the options available to help people get where they want and need to be – safely and conveniently. Just as we did so many decades ago, we are remaking our company to meet this new challenge.

Importantly, just as Kiichiro Toyoda recognized in 1930, today we understand the true value offered by this groundbreaking technology is not in the machines themselves, but in what they offer to society. Our ultimate goal is not to create autonomy for cars, but rather to expand autonomy for people – to create a society where mobility is safe, convenient, enjoyable, and available to everyone.

As we pursue this vision, we are guided by a commitment to the safety of everyone who uses our vehicles – both in how we research, develop, and validate the performance of vehicle technology and in how we aim to benefit society. In addition to the tremendous positive benefits they offer, cars and trucks are involved in crashes that result in more than a million fatalities annually on the world’s roads. Our research into automated driving is in the direct lineage of Toyota’s long-standing focus on improving automobile safety and advances our ultimate aim of realizing a future without traffic injuries or fatalities.

As we pursue this vision, we are guided by a commitment to the safety of everyone who uses our vehicles – both in how we research, develop and validate the performance of vehicle technology, and in how we aim to benefit society.

Thus, we are working to ensure consumers enjoy the benefits of this research sooner rather than later, including by making active safety technology and advanced driver assistance systems available across Toyota and Lexus vehicles. For example, the Toyota Safety Sense and Lexus Safety System + packages include Automatic Emergency Braking, Lane Keep Assist and Automatic High Beams. By the end of 2017, these packages will be available as standard or optional equipment on new Toyota and Lexus vehicles in Japan, Europe, and the United States.

This document provides a comprehensive overview of Toyota’s approach to automated driving, including the dual concepts of Guardian and Chauffeur that guide our research and the Mobility Teammate Concept that guides our product development. We intended it to serve as a central resource to enhance awareness of our accomplishments to date and the work still to be done.

As with any technology revolution, the impact of automated driving will go well beyond cars and trucks to include new business models and product categories, ranging from mobility service platforms to personal robotics solutions. Major challenges remain, but we are inspired to help lead the way toward the future of mobility as we continue to focus on enriching lives around the world with safe and responsible ways of moving people.

TOYOTA'S SAFETY PHILOSOPHY

Toyota approaches automotive safety through three distinct pillars: people, vehicles, and the traffic environment. Under this framework, the company is focused not just on developing new safety technologies, but also on expanding safety education programs and partnerships with governments and other stakeholders to improve the construction of roads and other traffic infrastructure.

Toyota analyzes causes of vehicle-related accidents and occupant injuries by using various accident investigation data. Accidents are recreated in various simulations to help us develop safety technologies. In addition, experiments on actual vehicles are conducted before launch. Post-launch, the effectiveness of the technologies is evaluated by assessing any accidents that might occur.

We strive to learn from actual accidents to continue to help meet the industry's ever higher safety standards.



Toyota approaches automotive safety through three distinct pillars: people, vehicles, and the traffic environment. Under this framework, the company is focused not just on developing new safety technologies, but also on expanding safety education programs and partnerships with governments and other stakeholders to improve the construction of roads and other traffic infrastructure.




Toyota analyzes causes of vehicle-related accidents and occupant injuries by using various accident investigation data. Accidents are recreated in various simulations to help us develop safety technologies. In addition, experiments on actual vehicles are conducted before launch. Post-launch, the effectiveness of the technologies is evaluated by assessing any accidents that might occur.

We strive to learn from actual accidents to continue to help meet the industry's ever higher safety standards.




This work is united under the company’s Integrated Safety Management Concept, which focuses on mitigating the risk of collision at each stage of driving. This includes Parking, Active Safety, Pre-Collision Safety, Passive Safety, and Rescue. Since the 1990s, Toyota has used this approach to support the development of automated driving technologies, with new developments offering consumers increases in safety by expanding the range of potential causes of collisions that can be mitigated by the vehicle.

Download the Integrated Safety Management Concept